Monthly Archives: June 2016

The Impact of Online Film Distribution

Written By: Alba Ortiz Reyes and Ricardo Derose

Online distribution has become all the rage for a smaller budget and independent films as an option for sharing the created content.  The Internet explosion and advanced technology, multiple platforms are dedicated to providing online distribution for these smaller scale projects.

Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, and Vimeo on Demand are just three of the big corporations in that field.  These companies provide small businesses and filmmakers, not affiliated with a studio, the chance to distribute the created content for a lower portion of the profits without necessarily going through traditional costly distribution.  However, getting onto these platforms is not a simple matter.

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Amazon Prime Video, for example, requires filmmakers to work in conjunction with a direct Amazon aggregator. Therefore, a filmmaker has the opportunity for their film to have a platform.   An aggregator has specific software that collects creative content for these different online distribution companies.  The aggregator then will charge the filmmaker a fee to begin the process of sending the film/ creative content to the online distributor.  However once the product has made it onto the platform (in this case APV), the creator get paid per stream.

Viemo

The other option available would be something where the filmmaker himself has to make the views happen.  Vimeo on Demand is the best example.  With Vimeo the creator pays a yearly subscription and the platform then allows the user to upload his content and charge for the views. However, it then falls on the creator himself to get people to watch the film.

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Lastly, there is Netflix.  Netflix has over 30 million subscribers, but it does not pay for the views.  In fact, it only pays for the license to stream the content.  It is a great way of promoting the product, but it does not provide additional income per views.  It serves mostly as a great marketing strategy for the creator and a way to create an online portfolio of sorts.

In the old days, the only way for a filmmaker to get his work published and distributed was through negotiations with a major film distributor or film company. The Indie Filmmakers were almost nonexistent. Because they had no way of showing their work if a major Film Company did not accept it.  Nowadays, with the new technology and the power of the Internet it has gotten easier for filmmakers to distribute their work.  However, they also have to rely on their network to properly market the product to make a profit. These are only three (3) of the many options available to filmmakers for online distribution.  As an independent filmmaker it is important to make the proper research to find the platform that fits the needs of the created content.

APA Sources:

Abonnieren, N. (2012, September 18). NoseDive. Retrieved June 30, 2016, from http://www.netzkino.de/netzkinoapps.html

BruBaker, J. (2016). Sell A Movie To NetFlix. Retrieved June 30, 2016, from http://www.filmmakingstuff.com/sell-a-movie-to-netflix/

Exclusive access to Prime Day. (n.d.). Retrieved June 30, 2016, from https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DBYBNEE?_encoding=UTF8

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Independent Films in the Chinese Film Markets

Richard Pontigo                 BK Patterson                 Tres Savid

One of the hardest film markets to release an independent foreign film in is the Chinese film market. Even though they have had an annual growth of 34% in their film market each year, only 34 films were released in Chinese theaters that were foreign films. Even though there were only 34 films released they grossed 7 billion dollars. The Chinese film market is very specific to what they let there people see by regulating the content and even the release dates. Films that gross the most in China are action/comedy genre such as their film The Mermaid and Monster Hunt. The Chinese people do have certain themes that they do not enjoy such as themes dealing with time travel (Back to the Future) or films about the government suppressing its people (V for Vendetta). When making an independent film, that is planned to be released in China, these factors need to be considered.

There are a few different ways to release a foreign independent film into the Chinese market. The first is to acquire Chinese partners such as the China Film Group Corporation, CFGC, or the Huaxia Film Distribution Co. The China Film Group Corporation is a state owned business that has the exclusive rights to import foreign movies to China. Huaxia is the second and only other distributer of foreign movies in China. They have had problems importing movies, and its distribution strength is not as great as CFGC.

Another way to release a foreign independent film is to be bought out by a Chinese local distributor for a fixed price. This can be done in two ways by either a one time buyout or revenue-shared buyout, where you can receive revenue share in addition to the buyout price.

One other way we found to have our film distributed in China is through their film festivals. These films festivals include the Beijing International Film Festival, the Beijing Independent Student Film Festival, and the BigScreen Festival. There are many problems and troubles when attempting to release into the Chinese film markets but if you succeed the profits can be exponential.

Links to Chinese Film Festivals:

  1. http://www.bjiff.com/enHome/

It’s About the Story

By: Stormy Hupp and Erin McLynch

It’s a common misconception that filmmaking requires top of the line equipment, a big crew and a deep pocket of change. In my time at school I have realized that it’s not at all about how much money you have, the size of your crew or what camera you use; it’s about the story. At the end of the day, when audiences are watching a film they’re invested in the story. The point of a film is to transport your audience to another time and place and to evoke emotions; to make them laugh, scream and cry. The best filmmaking is invisible, which means the focus is on the story. When you have done your job as a filmmaker effectively, the audience won’t care about the camera you used or your budget or the size of the crew; at the end of film all they remember is the story.

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There have been great films shown at Sundance that were shot entirely on an iPhone. Plenty of major motion pictures have been shot on a DSLR and they look equally as cinematic and get the message across just as well as a top of the line Arri Alexa camera would. DSLRs are a great option to shoot your film on a low budget because they are very affordable and look very professional. Not to mention, there are several benefits of using a smaller camera, such as, it allows you more freedom to move around freely and to get creative shots that you couldn’t get with a large bulky camera. It also cuts down on crew and time which saves money. If you’re using a small camera you don’t need to spend time on set building the camera and you don’t need several people just to run it which is important if you’re low on budget or crew members.

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We are storytellers first and filmmakers second. Our main focus and goal at the end of the day is to tell a good story; stop focusing on money, cameras, and budget that you don’t have and instead focus on the story and the tools you do have.

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Further Reading:

TheBlackandBlue: http://www.theblackandblue.com/2011/02/23/cameras-dont-make-movies-people-do/

VideoMaker: https://www.videomaker.com/article/c11/18139-why-story-is-the-most-important-aspect-of-video

Image references: http://bit.ly/295So8b

 

 

No Budget to Low Budget: Marketing for the low based on Drake

No Budget to Low Budget:Marketing for the low based on Drake

By Chad Happens & Crawford Norman III

     In the Digital Age we now live in it means nothing to create visual content if no one in the whole wide connective world sees it. If you have major studio, network, or a major content provider’s backing all you have to do is throw money into the marketing department and call it a day. However, if you are a poor independent filmmaker you have some work ahead of you. It can get a bit technical, but here are a few tips on how to grow your social media presence using Drake.

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Started From the Bottom now we Hashtag

#PIGGYBACKING – Hashtags are essentially the 6 degrees of separation of the internet. You’re so close to a celebrity and one Repost away from being seen.  

So here is what you do:

  1. HASHTAG LIFE | Create a hashtag for you brand and project – #Brand #Project
  2. STACK + BOOST | Add at-least three to five (3 to 5) more hashtags that relate to film, your particular project, and ANYTHING related to it.
  3. FOLLOW + FOLLOW BACK | On whichever social network you’re using, search those Hashtags and FOLLOW others who’ve used them as well. They will more than likely follow you back. That’s a plus for you.
  4. REPOST + TAG | You likely didn’t work on your project alone (If you did you deserve a trophy), so tag them and have them repost it and ask others to follow and repost.

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Views for the 6 (major social media sites)

These are a few of the top social networks Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Tumblr and YouTube.

  1. You need to create an account on all of them and stay as close to the same name/handle as possible.
  2. Make sure you create separate accounts for your personal stuff and your work. If you create a brand page instead of specific project page you can feature your future projects w/o having to create new accounts. Follow Lionsgate on any network you’ll see how they change for each project.
  3. There are FREE scheduling apps/websites that will post things for you when you don’t have time.
  4. Your brand/project account isn’t you so NO PERSONAL STUFF

 

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Take Care (of your Audience)

One thing about social media is that you have to be social.

  • Talk to your audience /reply back / get feed back.
  • Be nice and personable. People will not support you if you’re being an asshole.
  • If you really wanted to build some social media karma it is ok to support other’s work.

These tips will surely have you ready for success like ya boy Drizzy Drake.

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Quality Faith-based Films Can Be Made with a Low Budget

Faith-based films are growing in popularity and can be done at low-cost by emerging filmmakers. They have a strong following and there are many famous people passionate about it who will perform for a lower cost if they believe in the story. One great example is the movie, Miracles from Heaven. With a low budget of $13 million it domestically grossed over $61 million and with famous names attached, Jennifer Garner and Queen Latifah. Also, Heaven is for Real had a low budget of $12 million and the domestic gross amount is over $91 million.

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Why Religious Movies Are Luring Mainstream Stars:

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/why-religious-movies-are-luring-875643

Faith-based films are building a following at the box office: http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-faith-based-movies-20160325-story.html

Why audiences flock to faith-based films:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-30/why-audiences-flock-to-faith-based-films

Faith-based films made on a budget. Can the new wave transcend propaganda?: http://www.avclub.com/article/can-new-wave-faith-based-filmmaking-transcend-prop-234051

How Do Get Started in Christian Films:

http://www.christianfilms.com/getting-started-in-christian-films.php

It is possible to find people who have a passion for faith-based films and make a low-budget film and find distributers if you have a great story. Green Apple Entertainment is a leading, worldwide sales agent, distributor and aggregator of quality, independent entertainment.

Green Apple Entertainment:

http://greenappleent.com

Looking for Help Finding a Distributor?

Chris Vander Kaay is a filmmaker-producer who has cultivated many good relationships with distribution companies in his time working.  He is looking to help other Christian filmmakers get their work to distributors.  There are NO upfront fees.  The only fees involved are if the film finds distribution.  Contact Chris at In The Margin.

Exploration Films is seeking value-based and family oriented programming for distribution consideration.

http://www.explorationfilms.com

Written by Katherine Dudley and Will Hewell

Short Films; Maximum Impact

In the independent world of filmmaking, budgets are tight, crews are small, and time is of the essence. Anyone can get out and make a short film if they have a camera, some talent, and a few nice looking locations. But who wants to just make a short that gets no notoriety? In the film business of making shorts it’s important to take proper steps in making your short so that it can have a maximum impact that could get a feature into the making.

Lets discuss a film that was a short to begin with, but later had so much impact that it was made into a feature. Saw (2004) was made on a $2,000 budget, and was shot in just one week. This film managed to get so many views and hype behind it through film festivals that within a years time the feature was released. Director James Wan says its important to be passionate about your films creation and the ideas put into it, had he not been this project may not have appealed to the people it did. The style needs to feel expressive of the story being told. In the short film Saw (2003), they recreated their own personal nightmare with a tension that is contagious to anyone who views it. The feature was made only one year later and went on to make $103,880,027 worldwide. This feature went on to create 6 sequels, and became a worldwide phenomenon going on to gross $878,139,093 and that’s not including DVD or Video sales.

Saw Franchise

With a success like mentioned above, short films of its kind are making their way into features more often. Another famous short by the name of “Lights Out”, which in its true short form is only 2:42 in length and was created back in 2013.The short, went viral, and James Wan saw it and contacted the Director David F. Sandberg. This short has now been made into a feature by the same title ‘Lights Out’ that will be released worldwide on July 22, 2016.

Lights Out Feature Screengrab

These films had so much impact due to their creators having relentless passion, and a determination to get the job done. They were focused on being able to appeal to their crowds by creating shorts that they wanted to watch themselves.

Saw (Short): https://youtu.be/RfgtAlpnEf8

Lights Out (Short): https://youtu.be/-fDzdDfviLI

Articles on Saw and Lights Out Creations:

Interview with James Wan and Leigh Whannell

How the 3-minute Short ‘Lights Out’ became a Hollywood Feature

Written By: Kierra Colston & Blake Heffelfinger

 

 

5 Interview Tips for the Entertainment Industry

By Gabriel Iath & Eduardo Avila.

The crucible of the job search is the interview. Even if you know the person who’s hiring, it’s a formality that all the job applicants have to undertake. Here are five interview tips that will help you hit it out of the park.

1 – Break the ice!

Shipping Season Opens

Author and co-founder of “Just for Laughs” Andy Nulman writes that it’s vital to break the ice in the first 90 seconds of meeting the employer. By doing so, you have a much better chance of having a smooth interview and leaving a great impression. Small talk is your friend, but remember to talk about subjects that aren’t controversial. Talk about something industry related like box office numbers, films in development, new TV shows, and executive decisions.

2 – Know your employer.

People Harvey Weinstein

It sounds obvious, but you’d be surprised by the amount of people that walk into an interview without knowing anything about the company. Employers have dozens of candidates for that opening, and you are just wasting everyone’s time if you don’t do your research. Here’s a useful way to display your knowledge, according to author Jenny Martin: “(…)as I’m walking you out of the lobby, gesture to the giant posters of Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie on the way and say, “IMDB says you guys have a sequel in the works,” and I know you know how to prep for an interview. I’m already glad I met with you and we haven’t even gotten to my office!”

3 – Sound confident.

Ayrton Senna

This is more of a general note for interviews: if you sound like you know what you’re talking about, people will perceive you as a knowledgeable person. Don’t go too far or you can sound pretentious and even fake. Sounding confident is key to making a great impression and having people remember you. Don’t confuse it with sounding confident about subjects you have no knowledge about. People in hiring positions can see right past your fake confidence.

4 – Tell a story.

Molly Maguires

Employers will generally go over your resume then ask you to tell a story that proves that you have the necessary skillset for the job. Come prepared! The story you will tell will vary based on the position you’re interviewing for, keep that in mind. For example: if you’re interviewing for a director of photography position, a good story would be how you successfully lit a scene with minimal equipment. The key to these stories is displaying how you overcame an obstacle in order to succeed.

5 – Tell the employer you WANT the job.

Michel Temer

Many people assume that because they took the interview it means the employer knows they want the job. It might be the case, but verbally communicating it reinforces that you’re actively pursuing a job with that company. After the interviewer has finished talking, tell him how excited you are for this opportunity and that you would love to work there.

Sources:

http://www.monster.ca/career-advice/article/just-for-laughs-festival-hiring-canada

http://www.careerealism.com/entertainment-job-interview/

Photos from the AP